Edge Reviews

A Full Review for the 2014 Ford Edge offered by a Dealer in Louisville Kentucky, KY

What’s New for the 2014 Ford Edge

The 2014 Ford Edge is unchanged.

Introduction

When it comes right down to it, shopping for a new crossover SUV is a lot like trying on clothes. Three-row, seven-passenger models can feel way too big, while compact crossovers may seem a little too confining. That brings us to the 2014 Ford Edge, a five-passenger midsize crossover that splits the difference between these two extremes in a way that could make it a comfortable fit for you.

Besides its right-size dimensions, the Edge owes its popularity to its sleek styling and a comfortable interior filled with a long list of appealing high-tech options. These run the gamut from handy conveniences like the Sync system’s voice control to important safety features like rear cross-traffic alert and forward collision warning systems, both of which are designed to help avert potential crashes. The Edge also offers a likable driving experience, with confident handling and a quiet and smooth ride. The standard 3.5-liter V6 delivers a level of performance most buyers will find satisfactory, but Ford offers two other engines as well: an available turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder for greater fuel economy or a slightly more powerful V6 in the Sport trim.

The Edge does have a few drawbacks, most notably the available MyFord Touch system, which has a less than intuitive menu structure and can be sluggish to process commands. Accordingly, we’d encourage you to take a look at some of the Ford’s similarly sized and priced competitors. Topping the list is the 2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee, which is equally comfortable in everyday driving, yet can be fitted to be more off-road-worthy. The Jeep also comes with available diesel or V8 power. Other desirable models include the well-equipped Nissan Murano, the Volkswagen Touareg and the likable Toyota Venza.

Ultimately, though, the 2014 Ford Edge has found a nice middle ground between its larger and smaller competitors, and many crossover shoppers are likely to find that it meets most, if not all of their needs.

Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options

The 2014 Ford Edge is a midsize crossover SUV that seats five passengers. It’s offered in four trim levels: SE, SEL, Limited and Sport.

The entry-level SE comes standard with a V6 engine, 17-inch alloy wheels, rear privacy glass, air-conditioning, cloth upholstery, 60/40-split-folding and reclining rear seats, a tilt-and-telescoping steering wheel, cruise control, a 4.2-inch display screen and a six-speaker sound system with a CD player and an auxiliary audio input jack. The optional Convenience package adds automatic headlights, keypad entry, rear parking sensors, a subfloor cargo organizer and an auto-dimming rearview mirror. The optional Equipment Group 101A bundles automatic headlights, keypad entry, rear parking sensors, an auto-dimming rearview mirror, satellite radio, the Sync voice command interface, Bluetooth phone and audio connectivity and a USB/iPod interface.

Moving up to the SEL model gets you the above options as standard plus 18-inch alloy wheels, heated mirrors, dual-zone automatic climate control, an eight-way power driver seat (includes power lumbar), an “EasyFold” second-row seat and a leather-wrapped steering wheel.

The SEL’s Equipment Group 204A includes a rearview camera, leather upholstery, heated front seats and a six-way power front passenger seat (manual recline) with fold-flat capability. The 205A group has those optional features plus the MyFord Touch electronics interface with an 8-inch central touchscreen, a configurable gauge cluster, enhanced steering wheel controls, enhanced Ford Sync features and a second USB port for audio devices. The SEL appearance package adds 20-inch wheels, specific headlight and taillight treatments, a body-colored grille and unique leather/simulated suede seating.

The Sport model comes with all of the SEL’s standard equipment, the contents of the 204A and 205A groups, a 12-speaker Sony sound system, HD radio, a more powerful V6 engine, 22-inch alloy wheels, a sport-tuned suspension and special exterior styling.

The upscale Limited also starts with a majority of the SEL’s optional features as standard and then adds 18-inch chrome-finish alloy wheels, an eight-way power front passenger seat and the 12-speaker Sony sound system with HD radio. The Equipment Group 301A option adds a panoramic sunroof, xenon headlights, keyless ignition and entry, remote start, a power liftgate and a navigation system. The 302A group has those features plus rain-sensing wipers, blind-spot monitoring and rear cross-traffic alerts. Also optional are 20-inch alloy wheels and adaptive cruise control with a collision warning system.

A few of the Limited’s extra features, such as the sunroof, navigation system and blind-spot monitoring, are also available for the SEL and Sport. A rear-seat entertainment system with dual headrest displays is also optional for every Edge, except the SE.

Powertrains and Performance

Under the hood, most 2014 Ford Edge models get a standard 3.5-liter V6 engine that produces 285 horsepower and 253 pound-feet of torque. A six-speed automatic transmission and front-wheel drive are standard; all-wheel drive is available as an option. EPA estimated fuel economy is 22 mpg combined (19 city/27 highway) with front-wheel drive and 21 combined (18/25) with all-wheel drive.

Optional on all but the Sport model is a 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder engine (called the EcoBoost) that generates 240 hp and 270 lb-ft of torque. A six-speed automatic and front-wheel drive are standard; all-wheel drive is not available with this engine. In Edmunds performance testing, an Edge with the four-cylinder went from zero to 60 mph in 8.4 seconds: slower than average, but not unreasonably so. More importantly, the EPA’s fuel economy estimate for this powertrain is an impressive 24 mpg combined (21 city/30 highway).

The Sport model is powered by a 3.7-liter V6 rated at 305 hp and 280 lb-ft of torque. A six-speed automatic transmission (with shift paddles) and front-wheel drive are standard, with all-wheel drive offered as an option. In Edmunds performance testing, an all-wheel-drive Edge Sport went from zero to 60 mph in 7.5 seconds — a good time for the segment. Official EPA fuel economy stands at 22 mpg combined (19/26) with front-wheel drive and 19 mpg combined (17/23) with all-wheel drive.

Safety

Standard safety features on the 2014 Ford Edge include antilock disc brakes, stability control, front-seat side airbags and full-length side curtain airbags. Also standard is Ford’s programmable MyKey system, which allows parents to limit vehicle speed and stereo volume for teen drivers. A rearview camera is optional for the SEL and standard on the Sport and Limited, while everything except the SE gets rear parking sensors as standard. Optional on all trims except the SE are blind-spot monitoring and rear cross-traffic alert systems. The Limited can also be equipped with a forward collision warning system.

In Edmunds brake testing, an all-wheel-drive Ford Edge Sport stopped from 60 mph in 122 feet: better than average for this class of vehicle. In fairness, that particular Edge was equipped with giant 22-inch wheels and sticky summer performance tires, but a four-cylinder Edge with more conventionally sized 18-inch wheels and all-season tires managed to stop in 124 feet, still a bit better than average for this class.

In the most recent government crash tests, the Edge received an overall rating of four out of five stars. Within that score, it received three stars for overall frontal protection and five stars for overall side protection. In Insurance Institute for Highway Safety crash tests, the Edge scored the highest possible rating of “Good” in the moderate-overlap frontal-offset, side-impact and roof strength tests. Its seat/head restraint design also earned a top “Good” rating for whiplash protection in rear impacts.

Interior Design and Special Features

Inside the 2014 Ford Edge, you’ll find an attractive cabin with a modern look and feel. The available MyFord Touch system adds to the sleek high-tech appearance with a large centrally located touchscreen and two smaller screens in the gauge cluster. These configurable displays can show a wide range of audio, climate and navigation system information.

While the MyFord Touch interface looks slick, its operation is hampered by small virtual buttons on the main touchscreen and controls that are slow to respond and prone to the occasional glitch. You’ll likely acclimate to MyFord Touch and its idiosyncrasies (plus, the Sync voice command system continues to be a useful workaround), but in general, other systems are easier to use.

Up front, the Edge offers seats that are impressively comfortable and supportive. Rear-seat passengers will be comfortable in the outboard positions, thanks to reclining seatback cushions that offer good comfort and decent legroom, but the rear center position is fairly uncomfortable (unless you’re a toddler riding in a car seat). Tall passengers will also find rear headroom in short supply in Ford Edges equipped with the panoramic sunroof.

When it comes to cargo capacity, the Edge offers a useful 32 cubic feet of space behind the second-row seats. Fold the 60/40-split seatbacks down and you end up with a slightly sloped load floor and 69 cubic feet of space. Shorter individuals may have trouble reaching and closing the rear liftgate on Edges that don’t have the power liftgate option.

Driving Impressions

On the road, the first thing you notice about the 2014 Ford Edge is its civilized ride quality and hushed interior. Also notable are the Edge’s secure handling and precise steering — both of which make it easy to maneuver. The Sport model’s handling is even more responsive, but its firmer suspension and oversized wheels make the ride too harsh.

The standard 285-hp V6 engine’s balance of performance and fuel economy should suit most buyers. The Sport model’s gutsier V6 may seem attractive if you’re plagued by a heavy right foot, but it doesn’t provide significantly quicker acceleration. Meanwhile, the available turbocharged four-cylinder might not seem like enough engine for a vehicle this size, but its impressive refinement and better fuel economy should be enough to convince you otherwise. The six-speed automatic transmission matched with all three engines is capable, but it’s tuned to maximize gas mileage and that means it can be slow to downshift in highway passing situations.

The 2013 Ford Edge

Deciding on what size of crossover to buy can be tricky. Do you get a large crossover for maximum interior space and roomy third-row seating? Or do you get a small crossover for easier urban maneuverability and higher fuel economy? For some people, the middle ground is the way to go, which is why the 2013 Ford Edge midsize crossover should resonate with many shoppers.

This popularity largely stems from the Edge’s relatively maneuverable size, its handsome interior and many available high-tech features. The latter includes items such as adaptive cruise control, blind-spot warning and cross-traffic alert, a dual-screen rear-seat entertainment system, the Sync voice command system and the MyFord Touch electronic interface.

The Edge also boasts an overall driving experience that seems European in character, with a feeling of solidity and low road noise. A 285-horsepower V6 engine is standard, and a fuel-efficient, turbocharged four-cylinder engine is optional. Oddly, you have to pay extra to get the four-cylinder, but it simultaneously produces strong power and impressive fuel economy (30 mpg highway). With these fuel savings alone, it would take an estimated four years for this “EcoBoost” engine option to pay for itself.

The 2013 Ford Edge does have a couple downsides, the most notable being the aforementioned MyFord Touch electronics interface that’s drawn criticism from consumers and our editors alike for being difficult to figure out and frustrating to use. There are also a few other crossovers that might appeal more, including the off-road-capable Jeep Grand Cherokee or the similarly upscaleNissan Murano. But the Edge is a respectable choice and is worth a look if you want something that’s not too big or too small.

Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options

The 2013 Ford Edge is a midsize crossover SUV that seats five passengers. It is available in SE, SEL, Limited and Sport trim levels.

The base SE comes standard with a V6 engine, 17-inch alloy wheels, air-conditioning, cruise control, a tilt-and-telescoping steering wheel, a trip computer, reclining rear seats and a six-speaker sound system with a CD player and an auxiliary audio jack. The Convenience package adds rear parking sensors, sub-floor cargo organizer, exterior keypad entry, automatic headlights and an auto-dimming rearview mirror. Also optional are satellite radio and the Sync voice-command interface (including Bluetooth and USB/iPod connectivity) as part of the 101A option package.

The Edge SEL includes all the SE’s equipment along with 18-inch wheels, exterior keypad entry, dual-zone automatic climate control, ambient lighting, a USB port, an eight-way power driver seat (includes power lumbar), an “EasyFold” second-row seat and a leather-wrapped steering wheel. The Leather Comfort package adds leather upholstery, heated front seats and a six-way power passenger seat with manual recline and fold-flat capability.

Also optional are a rearview camera and the MyFord Touch system, which is an electronics interface that includes a large central touchscreen, two secondary screens in the gauge cluster, enhanced steering wheel controls, enhanced Ford Sync features (turn-by-turn navigation and traffic reports) and a second USB port for audio devices. The SEL appearance package adds 20-inch wheels, specific head- and taillamp treatments, a body-colored grille and unique leather seating.

From there, the Edge lineup forks into two directions. The Edge Limited comes with most of the above equipment plus 18-inch chrome wheels, heated mirrors, an eight-way power passenger seat and a 12-speaker Sony sound system with HD radio. The Driver Entry package includes keyless ignition/entry, remote ignition and a power liftgate (available separately on the SEL). Also optional are 20-inch wheels, xenon headlamps and adaptive cruise control with a collision warning system.

The Edge Sport, in contrast, essentially comes with all of the SEL’s standard and optional equipment along with a more powerful V6 engine, 22-inch wheels, a sport-tuned suspension, special exterior styling and the Sony sound system.

All but the SE can be equipped with several other options. The Vision package adds automatic wipers and a blind-spot warning system with cross-traffic alert. The voice-activated navigation system includes real-time traffic, weather and other information through the satellite radio feed. There is also a panoramic sunroof and a rear-seat entertainment system with dual headrest displays. A towing package with trailer-sway control is available only on V6-powered SEL and Limited models.

Powertrains and Performance

The 2013 Ford Edge comes standard with a 3.5-liter V6 that produces 285 hp and 253 pound-feet of torque. A six-speed automatic transmission and front-wheel drive are standard, but all-wheel drive is optional. EPA-estimated fuel economy stands at 19 mpg city/27 mpg highway and 22 mpg combined. That drops to 18/25/21 with all-wheel drive.

Optional on all but the Edge Sport is a 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder (dubbed EcoBoost) that produces 240 hp and 270 lb-ft of torque. A six-speed automatic paired to front-wheel drive is the only configuration available. In Edmunds performance testing, the Edge EcoBoost went from zero to 60 mph in 8.4 seconds — a bit slower than average but not unreasonably so. EPA-estimated fuel economy is an impressive 21 mpg city/30 mpg highway and 24 mpg combined.

The Ford Edge Sport gets a 3.7-liter V6 that produces 305 hp and 280 lb-ft of torque. A six-speed automatic transmission (with shift paddles) and front-wheel drive are standard, but all-wheel drive is optional. In Edmunds performance testing, an Edge Sport AWD went from zero to 60 mph in 7.5 seconds — a good time for the segment. EPA-estimated fuel economy is 19/26/22 with front-wheel drive and 17/23/19 with AWD.

Safety

Antilock disc brakes, stability control, front-seat side airbags and full-length side curtain airbags are all standard. Also standard is the programmable Ford MyKey system, which allows parents to limit vehicle speed and stereo volume for teen drivers. Optional on all trims except the SE is a Vision package that includes blind-spot and cross-traffic warning systems. The Limited can be equipped with a collision warning system.

In Edmunds brake testing, an all-wheel-drive Ford Edge Sport stopped from 60 mph in a better-than-average 122 feet. That was with giant wheels and sticky summer tires, but an Edge EcoBoost with regular wheels and rubber still managed to stop in 124 feet. That’s still better than average and monumentally better than Edges of the past.

In the most recent government crash tests, the Edge received an overall rating of four out of five stars. Within that score, it received three stars for overall frontal protection and five stars for overall side protection. In Insurance Institute for Highway Safety crash tests, the Edge scored the highest possible rating of “Good” in the frontal-offset, side-impact and roof strength tests.

Interior Design and Special Features

The 2013 Ford Edge features a modern-looking interior, especially on models equipped with MyFord Touch. This interface consists of three display screens and the ability to input commands for various audio, phone and navigation functions via voice, touch controls or buttons on the steering wheel. It’s a smart idea in theory, but in practice we’ve found the buttons difficult to identify at a glance and too easy to press accidentally.

The Edge’s front seats provide excellent support on longer trips. In back, the reclining outboard seats are nicely shaped and offer satisfactory legroom, but headroom can be tight if you order the dual-pane “Vista Roof” option. Furthermore, the middle seat is for short trips only due to its slablike seatback. Should you need a third-row seat, we highly recommend the Ford Flex.

Without the power liftgate, the Edge’s rear hatch can be hard for shorter drivers to close. Cargo capacity is a respectable 32 cubic feet with the backseat in use; folding it down opens up a not-so-flat cargo floor and a max capacity of 69 cubes. That’s more than a Nissan Murano can manage, but less than the Explorer or larger crossovers like the Flex and Chevy Traverse.

Driving Impressions

The 2013 Ford Edge is most notable for its comfortable, well-composed ride and a cabin stuffed full of sound insulation that provides an ultra-quiet, vaultlike environment. Handling is solid and secure, with a less cumbersome feel around corners and in parking lots than its larger Ford crossover siblings. The Sport model is, indeed, slightly sharper and more agile, but its enormous wheels degrade ride quality to the point where we doubt many drivers will accept the compromise.

The use of a four-cylinder engine in the heavy Edge may seem foolish, but this turbocharged power plant produces more torque than the base V6 and gets considerably better fuel economy. It’s also surprisingly quiet in operation, and really, if it was the only engine available we wouldn’t complain. Still, the base V6 is nevertheless a solid mill that few people should find wanting for power. The Edge Sport exists for those few, but that model’s heavier curb weight largely negates its power advantage. The standard six-speed automatic attached to all of the above is optimized for fuel efficiency, and as such can be slow to downshift.

Autoblog.com Review

Review by Chris Shrunk

The sport utility vehicle became an endangered species not long after fuel prices began to skyrocket. But while vehicle buyers changed their shopping habits, they didn’t actually stray that far from the SUV formula. Many of today’s hottest-selling vehicles are crossovers; essentially the same tall wagons as the SUV, but with a lighter unibody chassis.

Among other things, the CUV promised to deliver superior efficiency, and while some improvement has been evident, in many cases, the genre’s fuel savings have failed to impress. A good case in point is the Ford Edge. When Ford’s two-row CUV entered the market in 2007, it managed only 24 miles per gallon on the highway, and many buyers struggled to hit 20 mpg in mixed driving cycles. There were plenty of reasons for its unimpressive efficiency. Most crossovers remain substantially heavier than a comparable four-door sedan, and with plenty of frontal area, they don’t exactly slice through the wind. But perhaps the biggest issue has been unevolved powertrains.

Ford thinks it has the answer to that problem in the form of its new EcoBoost 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine. Ford is using the compact, turbocharged mill in a variety of crossovers, including the 2012 Ford Edge, and we sampled a well-equipped Edge Limited to see how effective the Blue Oval’s engine downsizing strategy is going.

2012 Ford Edge EcoBoost side view2012 Ford Edge EcoBoost front view2012 Ford Edge EcoBoost rear viewOur Dark Blue Pearl Metallic tester in Limited trim carried a base price tag of $34,915 that rises to $35,910 by ticking the EcoBoost option box. Ford doesn’t mess around when it comes to the Limited trim: Standard accoutrements include leather-trimmed and heated seats up front, a 10-way power driver’s seat, dual-zone climate control, SYNC infotainment, a 390-watt Sony sound system, back-up sensors and a rear view camera.Our Edge was also packed with some of Ford’s top options, including the 2.0-liter EcoBoost upgrade, Ford’s excellent navigation system ($795), and BLIS blind-spot detection ($485). This Edge Limited also included the Drivers Entry Package ($895), which adds remote start, push-button start and a power rear lift gate. Also making the scene was Ford’s much-maligned MyFord Touch system – in this guise, it includes a pair of 4.2-inch LED screens in the gauge cluster and five-way steering wheel controls. With all options present and accounted for, our tester came in at $38,910.2012 Ford Edge EcoBoost gauges2012 Ford Edge EcoBoost audio system display2012 Ford Edge EcoBoost navigation system2012 Ford Edge EcoBoost audio controlsThe draw for this Edge Limited is the 2.0-liter EcoBoost four-cylinder engine, which is a $995 option compared to the capable and relatively efficient 3.5-liter V6. The extra coin will deliver 240 horsepower and 270 pound-feet of torque mated to a smooth-shifting six-speed automatic transmission. That isn’t as much punch as the 285 horsepower 3.5-liter V6, but the real story comes with a twist – the turbo 2.0 boasts 17 more lb-ft than its bigger, naturally aspirated brother, and it arrives in full force at 3,000 rpm (the V6’s torque doesn’t max out until 4,000 revs).That extra pull is evident from behind the leather-wrapped steering wheel. The EcoBoost four provides good straight-line acceleration, with a 0-60 time that we estimate to be just over seven seconds. The EcoBoost also weighs a bit less, tipping the scales at 3,998 pounds – 58 fewer pounds than a front-drive V6 model. With torque that comes on early in the revband, the EcoBoost feels even quicker than any instrumented testing might suggest – at least until hitting the freeway. When we tested the V6-equipped Edge about a year ago, passing acceleration felt a bit stronger at highway speeds. The boosted four-cylinder also doesn’t sound quite as pleasant as the V6, but noise levels aren’t obtrusive.

2012 Ford Edge EcoBoost engine

The 58-pound weight advantage isn’t particularly significant, so there isn’t much difference in the handling department between the V6- and EcoBoost-powerd Edges. In fact, the Edge is still a bit of a porker, as this midsize CUV is a few sandwiches shy of two tons. Luckily, the EcoBoost powertrain has plenty of punch, and at 76 inches across, the Edge is all kinds of wide, which helps minimize body roll even when the roads get curvy. The Edge also employs a stiff yet forgiving chassis aided by MacPherson struts up front and an independent rear suspension with trailing blade, integrated knuckle and lateral links. We were a bit surprised to learn that Ford has taken a pass on electric power assisted steering here in favor of a traditional hydraulic setup, as moving to EPAS likely would’ve helped conserve a bit more fuel. The upside is that the variable-assist unit is accurate and quite natural in feel.

The real test of the EcoBoost four-cylinder isn’t how it goes and stops, however. We remain more interested in the Edge’s fuel economy, because the Environmental Protection Agency estimates suggest this diminutive powertrain should hit 21 miles per gallon in city driving and 30 mpg on the highway. Those are the kind of numbers that we might have hoped for from a midsize sedan only a few years ago, but the Edge manages to find membership in the 30 mpg club in spite of the fact that it’s the widest vehicle in its segment, weighing in at 238 pounds more than the longer Toyota Venza. While the lion’s share of the improvement is due to the smaller engine, Ford’s engineers have also executed a number of meaningful tweaks to the rest of the Edge package, including fitting low rolling-resistance tires along with revised rocker panels and active grille shutters for improved aero. Unlike its three-row sibling, the Ford Explorer, towing capacity remains the same regardless of which engine you choose: 3,500 pounds.

2012 Ford Edge EcoBoost headlight2012 Ford Edge EcoBoost fog light2012 Ford Edge EcoBoost wheel2012 Ford Edge EcoBoost taillight

Impressively, we were even more pleased with our real-world mileage. We averaged a surprising 25.1 miles per gallon during our week of driving. For comparison’s sake, we averaged 21.9 mpg in the 3.5-liter-equipped Edge, itself a reasonable number. Assuming our 3.2 mpg difference is representative of real-world fuel economy, is the EcoBoost’s efficiency increase worth $995? If we assume 12,000 miles per year and 87 octane gas sits at $3.50/gallon, the EcoBoost owner can expect to pay $1,673 for fuel each year. The equivalent 3.5-liter V6 owner faces a $1,917 tab – $245 more than the EcoBoost model. That means the $995 price tag of the EcoBoost model should pay for itself in about four years or about 50,000 miles. That’s far from an immediate return on investment, but it’s not bad and the equation could get more favorable if fuel prices spike.

The boosted four cylinder makes for fun and efficient motoring, and the experience is only enhanced by a rich and inviting cabin. Having been comprehensively upgraded for 2011, the Edge interior now boasts soft-touch materials everywhere occupants care to touch, including a terrific steering wheel and leather-clad shifter, plus a very cushy dash. The seats are also a plush affair, with enough cushion to find a place of honor in most living rooms, and enough bolstering to hug torsos without making drivers feel like weekend racers. The Edge also scores high praise for its roominess. Second row passengers are treated to gobs of hip room and a cavernous 39.6 cubic inches of legroom. Behind the second row 60/40 bench seat is 32 cubic feet of cargo room, which can be more than doubled to 68.9 cubic feet when the seats are folded. In other words, there’s more than enough space to haul that big screen television you’ve been eyeballing.

2012 Ford Edge EcoBoost interior2012 Ford Edge EcoBoost front seats2012 Ford Edge EcoBoost rear seats2012 Ford Edge EcoBoost rear cargo area

Our tester also came equipped with the aforementioned mother lode of technology. We’re big fans of SYNC and Ford’s intuitive hands-free calling setup, and the Sony audio system packs a serious punch. Our second attempt at MyFord Touch was a bit less confusing than the first, as we had a better handle on the four quadrants of information and their corresponding color coding. Phone connections are orange, navigation is green, entertainment is red and climate is blue. Easy-peasy, right? We also became accustomed to the five-way controls on the steering wheel, which helped us keep our hands on the wheel.

Unfortunately, we still found ourselves staring at the center console in order to sift through the heating and ventilation controls. Call us cavemen, but we prefer actual buttons and knobs to switchgear that can’t be easily discerned by touch. And when we used the steering wheel controls, we found ourselves gazing into the 4.2-inch screen on the right side of the gauge cluster trying to find the optimal settings. Not good, and a bit dangerous as well. Voice control is one way around the problem, but we often struggled to find the right words to satisfy the computerized voice on the other end – a potentially frustrating distraction in its own right. Overall, we much prefer driving models not fitted with the powerful yet cumbersome interface. We’re thinking MyFord Touch will take weeks for new owners to get reasonably comfortable with, and we hope the system gets easier to use with the major upgrade scheduled early next year.

2012 Ford Edge EcoBoost rear 3/4 view

All-in-all, the 2012 Edge with EcoBoost takes a terrific midsize crossover to the next level. The 2.0-liter turbo proved to be a joy to exercise, and our happiness was guilt-free thanks to impressive fuel economy for a CUV this size and weight. Mix in its attractive, broad-shouldered stance, and it’s clear that the 2012 Edge deserves to be a powerhouse in the midsize crossover field. Here’s hoping that MyFord Touch is friendlier in version 2.0, because it’s the only major blemish here.

 

Image Credit: Copyright 2011 Chris Shunk / AOL

Category: Crossover, Ford, New Car Reviews

Tags: 2012 ford edge ecoboost, ecoboost, edge, edge ecoboost, featured, ford, fuel economy, review, reviews

2012 Ford Edge EcoBoost FWD

By David Thomas

Cars.com National
October 15, 2012

Editor’s note: This review was written in February 2012 about the 2012 Ford Edge. Little of substance has changed with this year’s model. 

Ford’s Edge five-seat crossover has been an above-average student in its class. Never boasting segment-leading attributes, it remained popular because of its size, looks and, most recently, its high-tech features. For 2012, the Edge lineup adds a new 2.0-liter, turbocharged four-cylinder engine that moves the car confidently while returning excellent gas mileage.

The 2012 Ford Edge has a perplexing multimedia system and a surprising lack of accessible cabin storage, but it might be a sensible buy for shoppers in this class who are looking for good gas mileage and cargo space.

I tested the EcoBoost Edge with front-wheel drive. The 2013 model recently went on sale with few changes versus the 2011 and 2012 models.  EcoBoost’s Edge

The terrific thing about Ford’s most recent EcoBoost engine — the marketing term for its line of turbocharged power plants — is that it actually delivers on the promise of V-6 power with a four-cylinder engine. It doesn’t respond like the most robust V-6, mind you, but, for its class, it delivers nonetheless. EcoBoost is a $995 option on any of the Edge trim levels, which include SE, SEL and Limited. The Sport is only available with a 3.7-liter V-6.

I tested the EcoBoost Edge right after a week of driving the GMC Terrain crossover with an optional V-6 engine. Despite the Edge’s higher weight — an extra 131 pounds — the EcoBoost engine outperformed the Terrain V-6 in real-world driving, even when passing at highway speeds.

The EcoBoost engine produces 240 horsepower and 270 pounds-feet of torque, versus 285 hp and 253 pounds-feet from the available 3.5-liter V-6.

EPA-estimated mileage for the EcoBoost with front-wheel drive — all-wheel drive is only available with V-6 engines — is 21/30 mpg city/highway, which is considerably better than the V-6 Terrain’s 17/24 mpg rating. The 3.5-liter V-6 in the Edge — rated 19/27 mpg — also outdoes the Terrain. The Nissan Murano, available only with a V-6 and the most similar to the Edge in terms of interior and cargo volume, returns mileage of 18/24 mpg. The payoff there, however, is more spirited acceleration than either the Ford or GMC thanks to its 260-hp V-6.

The six-speed automatic transmission in the Ford also made for a smoother experience than you’ll get in the Terrain. The Terrain receives high marks from me in most respects; it just loses to the Ford here.

Where the Edge slips versus the Terrain and the rest of the class is in ride comfort. Seventeen-inch wheels are standard on the base SE model, while my SEL tester had standard 18-inch wheels. The suspension is rather firm; road imperfections transmit through the cabin in sharp jolts, making a bumpy road a bad place to be. The Murano, which I drove recently, has a better balance of performance and comfort than either the Edge or the Terrain.

Interior & Technology

The rest of the Edge remains relatively unchanged for 2012 and 2013, including the comfortable interior.

Front and rear seats are wide and offer plenty of support for larger drivers and passengers. However, front occupants have very limited storage options. There are only two cupholders in the center console and no other easily accessible cubbies for keys, smartphones, mints, toll passes, receipts, etc. There is a storage area behind the center stack of controls, but it’s hard to reach and you have to do so blindly. The other vehicles mentioned above have abundant cubbies.

My test vehicle also came with the latest version of MyFord Touch. It’s a multimedia system that’s drawn the ire of our editors since its debut, and even though it’s been improved and I’ve grown accustomed to the touch-sensitive interface, it remains a drag to use. What driver wants to hunt for seat-heater controls on a large touch-screen, or for radio controls on a slick panel devoid of buttons?

The Terrain sports many of the same high-tech features as MyFord Touch, including optional voice recognition, but uses physical controls for both radio and climate options. The Murano takes a similar approach. I prefer both to the MyFord Touch system.

Cargo

The Edge has a sizable rear cargo area: 32.2 cubic feet with the rear seats in place, 68.9 cubic feet with them down. That outdoes the Terrain, which has 31.6 and 63.9 cubic feet, respectively, as well as the Murano, at 31.6 and 64.0 cubic feet. Though these figures are in the same ballpark, the Murano and Edge have wider, more versatile cargo areas. The Terrain is narrower, though its cargo floor can be elongated thanks to sliding rear seats. If cargo is a concern, the Edge delivers.

Safety

The Ford Edge is an Insurance Institute for Highway Safety Top Safety Pick, scoring the highest marks in the organization’s crash and roof-strength tests. The Terrain is also a Top Safety Pick, but the Murano falls short because of a Marginal roof-strength rating.

All three SUVs score four out of five stars in the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s crash tests.

Ford Edge in the Market

Outside one of Cars.com’s ambitious Shootout tests, it’s rare that I’m exposed to both a new model and its most direct competition in such a short period of time. Because of that, the Edge’s flaws became more apparent. Its user-unfriendly high-tech multimedia system and lack of storage in front take away from an excellent, efficient powertrain and a large cargo area.

On a family outing with my two young children and wife, all that was overshadowed by the Edge’s uncomfortably firm suspension. If the decision were a toss-up before, my mind was made up then. I would prefer either the GMC, for a few thousand dollars less, or the Nissan, at a nearly identical price to the Edge.